Continuing from the previous piece about the birth of New York, here’s another bunch of stuff copied from a text book written by someone else. And again, it all seems fair enough at first until you start to dig deeper. Things I got wrong this time: Stuyvesant’s laws weren’t necessarily ‘too strict’ as much as utterly barbaric, particularly when it came to religious freedom. He forbade Protestants from worshipping even in their own homes, attempted to have Jewish refugees deported on the basis that they were a “deceitful race” who were “hateful” and “repugnant”, had a Quaker preacher publicly tortured and issued an ordnance that anyone harbouring a Quaker might be fined, imprisoned or even hanged The Dutch did surrender peacefully in 1664, but retook the colony in 1673 during the Third Anglo-Dutch War, only to hand it back to the English the following year as part of a peace treaty. There’s also speculation that it wasn’t so much a surrender anyway, more a corporate handover New York was indeed named after James, Duke of York, who was the brother of King Charles II. But James was also later crowned King of England, only to be deposed in 1688 by his own daughter Mary II and her husband William III (also known as William of Orange), who was already ruler of the Dutch Republic. Which makes the notion of whether the English or the Dutch then controlled New York deeply confusing. Not quite as confusing as how a King can be ruler of a Republic, but never mind Jacob Leisler did organise a rebellion against the ruling body in New York, becoming its ruler in 1690, but only for about a year before being arrested, imprisoned and tried, after which he was indeed found guilty of treason and hanged John Peter Zenger was arrested and tried for criticising the Governor in his newspaper, but in 1733, not 1735. His acquittal is regarded as a landmark case in American legal history, affirming press freedom in America. But successive Governors ignored it entirely, until the First Amendment to the US Constitution enshrined it in law in 1791 So actually, not bad. Not entirely accurate, but I could have done a lot worse.
September 1979 - March 1980
Under English Rule
Under English Rule
Manhattan Island Under English Rule The American War of Independence My Way to School Back to New York The Beginnings of Paris The Story of the Earth The Planets How the World is Changing Shape Rocks and Fossils The Seas How the Sea Shapes the Land The Nature Trail Way of Insect Watching What is Prehistory?
TERM 1 Sept-Dec 1979
TOPIC 1 Sept-Dec 1979
FAIRBURN The place where I wrote all this rubbish
WAEN SHEPHERD Who was this strange little boy?
GEOGRAPHY 1 Sept 1979 - Feb 1981
HISTORY 1 Sept 1979 - Oct 1981
The Forgotten World John and Mick fall foul of some extreme potholing
Bonfire Night Waen’s first time at the annual village fireworks display
Sheet Lightning Waen and his Gran shelter from the sheet- shaped storm
Christmas 1979 Can Waen last the night without opening his presents?
Continuing from the previous piece about the birth of New York, here’s another bunch of stuff copied from a text book written by someone else. And again, it all seems fair enough at first until you start to dig deeper. Things I got wrong this time: Stuyvesant’s laws weren’t necessarily ‘too strict’ as much as utterly barbaric, particularly when it came to religious freedom. He forbade Protestants from worshipping even in their own homes, attempted to have Jewish refugees deported on the basis that they were a “deceitful race” who were “hateful” and “repugnant”, had a Quaker preacher publicly tortured and issued an ordnance that anyone harbouring a Quaker might be fined, imprisoned or even hanged The Dutch did surrender peacefully in 1664, but retook the colony in 1673 during the Third Anglo-Dutch War, only to hand it back to the English the following year as part of a peace treaty. There’s also speculation that it wasn’t so much a surrender anyway, more a corporate handover New York was indeed named after James, Duke of York, who was the brother of King Charles II. But James was also later crowned King of England, only to be deposed in 1688 by his own daughter Mary II and her husband William III (also known as William of Orange), who was already ruler of the Dutch Republic. Which makes the notion of whether the English or the Dutch then controlled New York deeply confusing. Not quite as confusing as how a King can be ruler of a Republic, but never mind Jacob Leisler did organise a rebellion against the ruling body in New York, becoming its ruler in 1690, but only for about a year before being arrested, imprisoned and tried, after which he was indeed found guilty of treason and hanged John Peter Zenger was arrested and tried for criticising the Governor in his newspaper, but in 1733, not 1735. His acquittal is regarded as a landmark case in American legal history, affirming press freedom in America. But successive Governors ignored it entirely, until the First Amendment to the US Constitution enshrined it in law in 1791 So actually, not bad. Not entirely accurate, but I could have done a lot worse.
Under English Rule
TERM 1 Sept-Dec 1979
TOPIC 1 Sept-Dec 1979
FAIRBURN The place where I wrote all this rubbish
WAEN SHEPHERD Who was this strange little boy?
GEOGRAPHY 1 Sept 1979 - Feb 1981
HISTORY 1 Sept 1979 - Oct 1981
The Forgotten World John and Mick fall foul of some extreme potholing
Bonfire Night Waen’s first time at the annual village fireworks display
Sheet Lightning Waen and his Gran shelter from the sheet- shaped storm
Christmas 1979 Can Waen last the night without opening his presents?
September 1979 - March 1980
Under English Rule