It’s rare that I wrote about religion. Apart from a couple of Nativity-related pieces much later in the run (and a spectacular action-adventure rewrite of the Bible in one of my later Topic books), this is the only Biblical tale told anywhere in my Fairburn books. As I’ve written elsewhere, the church was a greater part of village life than it had ever been for me before. But I still didn’t engage with it that much, and finding this story here is a bizarre curiosity. So it’s the story of the Ten Plagues from the Book of Exodus. I can’t spell ‘pharoah’ properly but that’s totally forgivable. Scholars don’t agree which pharaoh but one popular theory suggests it might have been Rameses the Great - which makes it a bit strange that I mention his death so early on. Did I mishear something when the story was told to me? Or did I have inside information that the Pharaoh was actually Merneptah, Rameses’ successor? As for the rest of it - well, it’s slightly in the wrong order and misses a few off the list (I think my favourite is gnats), but essentially it’s the story as told in the Bible. I’m not sure Moses is supposed to have gone around saying that he personally was going to inflict these plagues upon Egypt rather than attributing them to Yahweh, but it’s clear it had the intended result. Moses never returns in my Fairburn books, but watch out in a few pages’ time for the Origin of Super Moses! (if I ever find the time to upload it…)
Moses and the Pharaoh
Moses and the Pharaoh
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Moses and the Pharaoh
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Exploring the Underworld Eight boys go exploring in a dangerous cave
TERM 3 1980 continues with the embassy siege and The Empire Strikes Back
Moses and
the Pharaoh
Moses and the Pharaoh Moses and the Pharaoh THE GHOUL  ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK Available now exclusively on Bandcamp
It’s rare that I wrote about religion. Apart from a couple of Nativity-related pieces much later in the run (and a spectacular action-adventure rewrite of the Bible in one of my later Topic books), this is the only Biblical tale told anywhere in my Fairburn books. As I’ve written elsewhere, the church was a greater part of village life than it had ever been for me before. But I still didn’t engage with it that much, and finding this story here is a bizarre curiosity. So it’s the story of the Ten Plagues from the Book of Exodus. I can’t spell ‘pharoah’ properly but that’s totally forgivable. Scholars don’t agree which pharaoh but one popular theory suggests it might have been Rameses the Great - which makes it a bit strange that I mention his death so early on. Did I mishear something when the story was told to me? Or did I have inside information that the Pharaoh was actually Merneptah, Rameses’ successor? As for the rest of it - well, it’s slightly in the wrong order and misses a few off the list (I think my favourite is gnats), but essentially it’s the story as told in the Bible. I’m not sure Moses is supposed to have gone around saying that he personally was going to inflict these plagues upon Egypt rather than attributing them to Yahweh, but it’s clear it had the intended result. Moses never returns in my Fairburn books, but watch out in a few pages’ time for the Origin of Super Moses! (if I ever find the time to upload it…)