Another appearance from my new best friend Andrew Wall, this time teamed up with Aaron Ross, so I’m tempted to think this was a group effort we made up in the playground, with me acting as the scribe. But it’s quite a complex and stupid idea, plus I spend a hell of a lot of it on my own, so I probably just made it all up by myself. Like Captain Carnivore, which must have been written around the same time, there’s a general theme of dinosaurs and time travel, our heroes able to flit between different times with ease. Not enough ease to stop us being eaten by dinosaurs though, and sure enough it’s Andrew - not me - who comes a cropper. Or does he? I’ve mentioned once or twice before that I don’t think I ever had a plan for these stories - that I didn’t think beyond the next sentence and just used to write the first thing that came into my head. But here’s a prime example of me doing the opposite of that. It’s obvious, from all the clues, that I at least had some kind of idea what was going on, and that I would reveal all in Part Two. But the second part never got written, so this is all guesswork. I think the unspoken truth about this tale is that the dinosaur, after being swallowed up by the molten lava, actually becomes Tyrannosaur Mountain, and the hand at the end which pulls me into the mouth belongs to Andrew, who clearly hadn’t been inside the dinosaur long enough to be digested. There are several fundamental problems with this - not least because it relies on us all believing that your average T-Rex was the same size as Kilimanjaro - but it seems pretty obvious that was going to be my big reveal in the next episode. This is building a worrying pattern. It’s at least the third story I’ve started in this English book and not finished. Maybe you could say it wasn’t really worth finishing, and maybe I knew that, even back then. But the likelihood is I just didn’t have the self-discipline. I was just way too keen to move onto the next new idea, which meant I very rarely took the time to build proper worlds, and the body of work I’ve left behind suffers as a consequence. You’d be right to say I’m being too harsh on the eight-year-old me. But it’s plagued me all the way through my adult life too. Maybe sometimes the new ideas are just too ambitious? Maybe I lose confidence. Maybe I just forget why I’m doing it. But it’s rare (unless someone actually pays me, in which case I can do anything, thanks very much Mr & Mrs Employer) that I’m able to finish what I started. I hope one day I’ll get over that. Then maybe my luck will change. I wonder if that’s what was in Mr Geraghty’s mind when he wrote “Good so far” in the margin at the end? It’s a rare appearance by him - in fact, it might be the first thing he’s written in this book - so he must have thought it quite an important thing to say. Apparently he also corrects my spelling now - but this is important too. The word ‘unconscious’ will crop up quite a lot from now on.
TERM 2 The birth of the 1980s - Blake’s 7, Blondie and battles in space
Waen Shepherd 2 Waen’s heroic antics in the far-flung future of 2007 AD!
The Mountain Called Tyrannosaurus Rex
The Mountain Called Tyrannosaurus Rex
Christmas 1979 Can Waen last the night without opening his presents?
The Forgotten World John and Mick fall foul of some extreme potholing
Great Space Battles Three mighty empires take their first steps into outer space
Ward’s 7 John Ward and his band of rebels fight the evil Federation
Fiends of the Eastern Front Vampires, paraphrased from 2000 AD
Apeth Badly-spelt high-jinks with a purple gorilla from outer space!
Captain Carnivore Gary Shepherd is hunted down by a deadly flying meteor
The Mountain Called Tyrannosaurus Rex
Florence Nightingale What if Florence Nightingale had lived in the Year 2000?
HELP ME KEEP THIS WEBSITE ALIVE
The Forgotten World John and Mick fall foul of some extreme potholing
TOPIC 2 The one where it all kicks off
TERM 2 The birth of the 1980s - Blake’s 7, Blondie and battles in space
Waen Shepherd 2 Waen’s heroic antics in the far-flung future of 2007 AD!
The Flame in the Desert An evil fire threatens the safety of the world
Apeth Badly-spelt high-jinks with a purple gorilla from outer space!
Captain Carnivore Gary Shepherd is hunted down by a deadly flying meteor
The Mountain Called
Tyrannosaurus Rex
The Mountain Called Tyrannosaurus Rex The Mountain Called Tyrannosaurus Rex
Another appearance from my new best friend Andrew Wall, this time teamed up with Aaron Ross, so I’m tempted to think this was a group effort we made up in the playground, with me acting as the scribe. But it’s quite a complex and stupid idea, plus I spend a hell of a lot of it on my own, so I probably just made it all up by myself. Like Captain Carnivore, which must have been written around the same time, there’s a general theme of dinosaurs and time travel, our heroes able to flit between different times with ease. Not enough ease to stop us being eaten by dinosaurs though, and sure enough it’s Andrew - not me - who comes a cropper. Or does he? I’ve mentioned once or twice before that I don’t think I ever had a plan for these stories - that I didn’t think beyond the next sentence and just used to write the first thing that came into my head. But here’s a prime example of me doing the opposite of that. It’s obvious, from all the clues, that I at least had some kind of idea what was going on, and that I would reveal all in Part Two. But the second part never got written, so this is all guesswork. I think the unspoken truth about this tale is that the dinosaur, after being swallowed up by the molten lava, actually becomes Tyrannosaur Mountain, and the hand at the end which pulls me into the mouth belongs to Andrew, who clearly hadn’t been inside the dinosaur long enough to be digested. There are several fundamental problems with this - not least because it relies on us all believing that your average T-Rex was the same size as Kilimanjaro - but it seems pretty obvious that was going to be my big reveal in the next episode. This is building a worrying pattern. It’s at least the third story I’ve started in this English book and not finished. Maybe you could say it wasn’t really worth finishing, and maybe I knew that, even back then. But the likelihood is I just didn’t have the self-discipline. I was just way too keen to move onto the next new idea, which meant I very rarely took the time to build proper worlds, and the body of work I’ve left behind suffers as a consequence. You’d be right to say I’m being too harsh on the eight- year-old me. But it’s plagued me all the way through my adult life too. Maybe sometimes the new ideas are just too ambitious? Maybe I lose confidence. Maybe I just forget why I’m doing it. But it’s rare (unless someone actually pays me, in which case I can do anything, thanks very much Mr & Mrs Employer) that I’m able to finish what I started. I hope one day I’ll get over that. Then maybe my luck will change. I wonder if that’s what was in Mr Geraghty’s mind when he wrote “Good so far” in the margin at the end? It’s a rare appearance by him - in fact, it might be the first thing he’s written in this book - so he must have thought it quite an important thing to say. Apparently he also corrects my spelling now - but this is important too. The word ‘unconscious’ will crop up quite a lot from now on.
HELP ME KEEP THIS WEBSITE ALIVE