Part Two. No idea if it was written the same day as the first part because again, there’s no date. But I imagine if I had time and I was fired up enough, I could easily manage a third page. Plus the pencil becomes seamlessly blunter as we plough through it all. As far as I’m concerned, it’s the same day. There’s a little bit more clarification about the Move of the Galaxy here, but only a tiny, tiny, tiny little bit. There’s a bit where an enemy ship “went out of the galaxy.” I assume this means it gets dragged out of the galaxy unexpectedly. Whatever that means. So does “Move of the Galaxy” mean that the galaxy moved? Obviously galaxies are continually moving anyway, like everything is continually moving. But let’s assume I knew and understood that already (which is deeply unlikely). I think what I meant was, the galaxy moved in a different way to the way in which it usually moved - a new, unexpected, jerky way, which means spaceships can suddenly fall out of space entirely, have their fronts broken off and eject passengers willy-nilly. Not sure whether giving this event a name like “The Move of the Galaxy” suggests it was a one-off that we should all know about from our history lessons (The Battle of Hastings) or if it happens every year (The Ides of March). But it’s definitely not an everyday occurrence. Even if I didn’t understand how galaxies moved, I might at least have expected myself to know that you can’t land a spaceship on a star. But even if that were possible, I’m still confused about whether it’s the enemy ship or the passenger ship that landed there, and how that translates to our heroes all ending up in prison. The reason it’s Alpha Centauri - as we’ll hear more about in a few days’ time - is because it sounds like Cygnus Alpha, the prison planet in the third episode of Blake’s 7, one of the few details I seem to be able to remember from its first series two years earlier. Whether this is the same Alpha Centauri we hear about in Great Space Battles is doubtful, but for the sake of building some grand Fairburn continuity, let’s assume it is. As for the executer - well… where there’s a will, there’s a way…
Ward's 7: Alpha Centauri
TOPIC 2 The one where it all kicks off
TERM 2 The birth of the 1980s - Blake’s 7, Blondie and battles in space
Great Space Battles Three mighty empires take their first steps into outer space
Waen Shepherd 2 Waen’s heroic antics in the far-flung future of 2007 AD!
Ward’s 7: Alpha Centauri
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Happy Easter! A home made Easter card I made for my Mum and Dad
The Forgotten World John and Mick fall foul of some extreme potholing
TOPIC 2 The one where it all kicks off
TERM 1 A day-by-day account of Waen’s first term at Fairburn School
TERM 2 The birth of the 1980s - Blake’s 7, Blondie and battles in space
Great Space Battles Three mighty empires take their first steps into outer space
Waen Shepherd 2 Waen’s heroic antics in the far-flung future of 2007 AD!
Ward’s 7:
Alpha Centauri
Ward's 7: Alpha Centauri
Part Two. No idea if it was written the same day as the first part because again, there’s no date. But I imagine if I had time and I was fired up enough, I could easily manage a third page. Plus the pencil becomes seamlessly blunter as we plough through it all. As far as I’m concerned, it’s the same day. There’s a little bit more clarification about the Move of the Galaxy here, but only a tiny, tiny, tiny little bit. There’s a bit where an enemy ship “went out of the galaxy.” I assume this means it gets dragged out of the galaxy unexpectedly. Whatever that means. So does “Move of the Galaxy” mean that the galaxy moved? Obviously galaxies are continually moving anyway, like everything is continually moving. But let’s assume I knew and understood that already (which is deeply unlikely). I think what I meant was, the galaxy moved in a different way to the way in which it usually moved - a new, unexpected, jerky way, which means spaceships can suddenly fall out of space entirely, have their fronts broken off and eject passengers willy-nilly. Not sure whether giving this event a name like “The Move of the Galaxy” suggests it was a one- off that we should all know about from our history lessons (The Battle of Hastings) or if it happens every year (The Ides of March). But it’s definitely not an everyday occurrence. Even if I didn’t understand how galaxies moved, I might at least have expected myself to know that you can’t land a spaceship on a star. But even if that were possible, I’m still confused about whether it’s the enemy ship or the passenger ship that landed there, and how that translates to our heroes all ending up in prison. The reason it’s Alpha Centauri - as we’ll hear more about in a few days’ time - is because it sounds like Cygnus Alpha, the prison planet in the third episode of Blake’s 7, one of the few details I seem to be able to remember from its first series two years earlier. Whether this is the same Alpha Centauri we hear about in Great Space Battles is doubtful, but for the sake of building some grand Fairburn continuity, let’s assume it is. As for the executer - well… where there’s a will, there’s a way…
Superman the Movie Souvenir programme from when I went to the pictures with Louise
ENGLISH 2 A general increase in manic stupidity and excessive violence
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